Buzzworthy Books for the Beginning of 2017

2017 is going to be a fantastic year for books.  I am extremely excited about the release of all the books listed below and can not wait to read these!

  1.  Lillian Boxfish Takes a Walk by Kathleen Rooney  In stores now.

I have been waiting for this book to come out ever since I saw the cover. A love letter to city life, this debut novel follows Lillian on the last night of 1984 through Manhattan, as she heads to a party.  As she walks, she reminisces about her life –from her entry level position writing copy for R.H. Macy’s to becoming the highest paid advertising woman in the country. The book “paints a portrait of a remarkable woman across the canvas of a changing America:  from the Jazz Age to the onset of the AIDS epidemic, the Great Depression to the birth of hip hop.”    From the excerpts that I have read, I think this book is going to be whip-smart and a fantastic read.  I also love the fact that the character of Lillian is based on the life of Margaret Fishback, who was reported to be the highest paid female advertising copywriter in the 1930’s and worked on various ad campaigns for Borden’s, Chef-Boy-Ar-Dee, Clairol and Seagram’s, just to name a few.

2.  HIstory of Wolves by Emily Fridlund   In Stores Now

History of Wolves is being described as a coming-of-age/thriller centered around 14 year old Linda.  “She is an outsider in all things.  Her understanding of the world comes from her observations at school, where her teacher is accused of possessing child pornography, and from watching the seemingly ordinary life of a family she babysits for.  Yet while the accusation against the teacher is perhaps more innocent than it seemed at first, the ordinary family turns out to be more complicated.  As Linda insinuates her way into the family’s orbit, she realizes they are hiding something.  If she tells the truth, she will lose the normal family life that she is beginning to enjoy with them; but if she doesn’t, their son may die.” (GoodReads Synopsis)

 

3.  Difficult Women by Roxanne Gay  In Stores Now

Difficult Women is a collection of stories of “rare force and beauty, of hardscrabble lives, passionate lives, and quirky and vexed human connection.  The women in these stories live lives of privilege and poverty, are in marriages both loving and haunted by part crimes or emotional blackmail.”  (GoodReads synopsis)

 

4.  The River at Night by Erica Ferencik In Stores Now

This book has dominated my instagram feed for the last few weeks, so I am eager to get my hands on it and see what all the hype is about.  “A high stakes drama set against the harsh beauty of the Maine wilderness, charting the journey of four friends as they fight to survive the aftermath of a white water rafting accident, The River At Night is a nonstop and unforgettable thriller by a stunning new voice in fiction.”  (GoodReads synopsis)

 

5.  A Harvest of Thorns by Corban Addison  Out January 24

I have received an advanced copy of this book and can not wait to get started reading it.  GoodReads Synopsis:  “A beloved American corporation with an explosive secret.  A disgraced former journalist looking for redemption.  A corporate executive with nothing left to lose.  In Dhaka, Bangladesh, a garment factory burns to the ground, claiming the lives of hundreds of workers, mostly young women.  Amid the rubble, a bystander captures a heart-stopping photograph — a teenage girl lying in the dirt, her body broken by a multi-story fall, and over her mouth a mask of fabric bearing the label of one of America’s largest retailers.   When the photo goes viral, fanning the flames of a decades old controversy about sweatshops, labor rights, and the ethics of globalization, one man will launch an investigation into the disaster that will reach father than he could ever imagine and threaten everything he has left in the world.”  “This exposé of the underbelly of the international fashion industry is disturbing, moving, and thoroughly engrossing.” PHILLIP MARGOLIN, New York Times bestselling author of Violent

 

6.  My Husband’s Wife by Jane Corry    Out January 31

“What if your life was built on a lie? When lawyer Lily marries Ed, she’s determined to make a fresh start. To leave the secrets of the past behind. But when she takes on her first criminal case, she starts to find herself strangely drawn to her client. A man who’s accused of murder. A man she will soon be willing to risk everything for. But is he really innocent? And who is she to judge? MY HUSBAND’S WIFE is a thriller with so many twists you won’t be able to put it down, perfect for fans of Liane Moriarty, Clare Mackintosh and C. L. Taylor.” (Synopsis from Amazon)

 

7. RIght Behind You by Lisa Gardner  Out January 31

“Eight years ago, Sharlah May Nash’s older brother beat their drunken father to death with a baseball bat in order to save both of their lives. Now thirteen years old, Sharlah has finally moved on. About to be adopted by retired FBI profiler Pierce Quincy and his partner, Rainie Conner, Sharlah loves one thing best about her new family: They are all experts on monsters.
Then the call comes in. A double murder at a local gas station, followed by reports of an armed suspect shooting his way through the wilds of Oregon. As Quincy and Rainie race to assist, they are forced to confront mounting evidence: The shooter may very well be Sharlah’s older brother, Telly Ray Nash, and it appears his killing spree has only just begun.
As the clock winds down on a massive hunt for Telly, Quincy and Rainie must answer two critical questions: Why after eight years has this young man started killing again? And what does this mean for Sharlah? Once upon a time, Sharlah’s big brother saved her life. Now, she has two questions of her own: Is her brother a hero or a killer? And how much will it cost her new family before they learn the final, shattering truth? Because as Sharlah knows all too well, the biggest danger is the one standing right behind you.”  (Synopsis from Amazon)

 

8.  A Separation by Katie Kitamura  Out February 7

“Named one of the most anticipated books of 2017 by the New York Times, Entertainment Weekly, Vulture, Huffington Post, and The Millions.  A young woman has agreed with her faithless husband: it’s time for them to separate. For the moment it’s a private matter, a secret between the two of them. As she begins her new life, she gets word that Christopher has gone missing in a remote region in the rugged south of Greece; she reluctantly agrees to go look for him, still keeping their split to herself. In her heart, she’s not even sure if she wants to find him. As her search comes to a shocking breaking point, she discovers she understands less than she thought she did about her relationship and the man she used to love.

A searing, suspenseful story of intimacy and infidelity, A Separation lays bare the guilt that divides us from the inner lives of others. With exquisitely cool precision, Katie Kitamura propels us into the experience of a woman on edge, with a fiercely mesmerizing story to tell.”  (Synopsis from Amazon)

 

9.  All The Lives I Want by Alana Massey  Out February 7

“Mixing Didion’s affected cool with moments of giddy celebrity worship, Massey examines the lives of the women who reflect our greatest aspirations and darkest fears back onto us. These essays are personal without being confessional and clever in a way that invites readers into the joke. A cultural critique and a finely wrought fan letter, interwoven with stories that are achingly personal, ALL THE LIVES I WANT is also an exploration of mental illness, the sex industry, and the dangers of loving too hard. But it is, above all, a paean to the celebrities who have shaped a generation of women–from Scarlett Johansson to Amber Rose, Lil’ Kim, Anjelica Houston, Lana Del Rey, Anna Nicole Smith and many more. These reflections aim to reimagine these women’s legacies, and in the process, teach us new ways of forgiving ourselves.”  (Synopsis from Amazon)

 

10.  We Were The Lucky Ones  Out February 14

It is the spring of 1939 and three generations of the Kurc family are doing their best to live normal lives, even as the shadow of war grows closer. The talk around the family Seder table is of new babies and budding romance, not of the increasing hardships threatening Jews in their hometown of Radom, Poland. But soon the horrors overtaking Europe will become inescapable and the Kurcs will be flung to the far corners of the world, each desperately trying to navigate his or her own path to safety.
As one sibling is forced into exile, another attempts to flee the continent, while others struggle to escape certain death, either by working grueling hours on empty stomachs in the factories of the ghetto or by hiding as gentiles in plain sight. Driven by an unwavering will to survive and by the fear that they may never see one another again, the Kurcs must rely on hope, ingenuity, and inner strength to persevere.
A novel of breathtaking sweep and scope that spans five continents and six years and transports readers from the jazz clubs of Paris to Kraków’s most brutal prison to the ports of Northern Africa and the farthest reaches of the Siberian gulag, We Were the Lucky Ones demonstrates how in the face of the twentieth century’s darkest moment, the human spirit can find a way to survive, and even triumph.

 

11.  Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders  Out February 14

“A moving and original father-son story featuring none other than Abraham Lincoln, as well as an unforgettable cast of supporting characters, living and dead, historical and invented.”

February 1862. The Civil War is less than one year old. The fighting has begun in earnest, and the nation has begun to realize it is in for a long, bloody struggle. Meanwhile, President Lincoln’s beloved eleven-year-old son, Willie, lies upstairs in the White House, gravely ill. In a matter of days, despite predictions of a recovery, Willie dies and is laid to rest in a Georgetown cemetery. “My poor boy, he was too good for this earth,” the president says at the time. “God has called him home.” Newspapers report that a grief-stricken Lincoln returns, alone, to the crypt several times to hold his boy’s body.
From that seed of historical truth, George Saunders spins an unforgettable story of familial love and loss that breaks free of its realistic, historical framework into a supernatural realm both hilarious and terrifying. Willie Lincoln finds himself in a strange purgatory where ghosts mingle, gripe, commiserate, quarrel, and enact bizarre acts of penance. Within this transitional state—called, in the Tibetan tradition, the bardo—a monumental struggle erupts over young Willie’s soul.
Lincoln in the Bardo is an astonishing feat of imagination and a bold step forward from one of the most important and influential writers of his generation. Formally daring, generous in spirit, deeply concerned with matters of the heart, it is a testament to fiction’s ability to speak honestly and powerfully to the things that really matter to us. Saunders has invented a thrilling new form that deploys a kaleidoscopic, theatrical panorama of voices to ask a timeless, profound question: How do we live and love when we know that everything we love must end?”  (Synopsis from Amazon)

 

12.  Waking Lions by Ayelet Gundar-Goshen   Out February 28

“After one night’s deadly mistake, a man will go to any lengths to save his family and his reputation.
Neurosurgeon Eitan Green has the perfect life–married to a beautiful police officer and father of two young boys. Then, speeding along a deserted moonlit road after an exhausting hospital shift, he hits someone. Seeing that the man, an African migrant, is beyond help, he flees the scene.

When the victim’s widow knocks at Eitan’s door the next day, holding his wallet and divulging that she knows what happened, Eitan discovers that her price for silence is not money. It is something else entirely, something that will shatter Eitan’s safe existence and take him into a world of secrets and lies he could never have anticipated.

WAKING LIONS is a gripping, suspenseful, and morally devastating drama of guilt and survival, shame and desire from a remarkable young author on the rise.”  (Synopsis from Amazon)

 

13.  The Rules Do Not Apply  Out March 14

“A gorgeous, darkly humorous memoir about a woman overcoming dramatic loss and finding reinvention—for readers of Cheryl Strayed and Joan Didion

When thirty-eight-year-old New Yorker writer Ariel Levy left for a reporting trip to Mongolia in 2012, she was pregnant, married, financially secure, and successful on her own terms. A month later, none of that was true.

Levy picks you up and hurls you through the story of how she built an unconventional life and then watched it fall apart with astonishing speed. Like much of her generation, she was raised to resist traditional rules—about work, about love, and about womanhood.

“I wanted what we all want: everything. We want a mate who feels like family and a lover who is exotic, surprising. We want to be youthful adventurers and middle-aged mothers. We want intimacy and autonomy, safety and stimulation, reassurance and novelty, coziness and thrills. But we can’t have it all.”

In this profound and beautiful memoir, Levy chronicles the adventure and heartbreak of being “a woman who is free to do whatever she chooses.” Her own story of resilience becomes an unforgettable portrait of the shifting forces in our culture, of what has changed—and of what is eternal.”  (Synopsis from Amazon)

 

14.  Sorry to Disrupt the Peace by Patty Yumi Cottrell  Out March 14

Helen Moran is thirty-two years old, single, childless, college educated, and partially employed as a guardian of troubled young people in New York. She is accepting a furniture delivery in her shared studio apartment when her uncle calls to break the news: Helen’s adoptive brother is dead.

According to the Internet, there are six possible reasons why her brother might have killed himself. But Helen knows better: she knows that six reasons is only shorthand for ”the abyss.” Helen also knows that she alone is qualified to launch a serious investigation into his death, so she purchases a one-way ticket to Milwaukee. There, as she searches her childhood home and attempts to uncover why someone would choose to die, she will face her estranged family, her brother’s few friends, and the overzealous grief counselor, Chad Lambo; she may also discover what it truly means to be alive.

A bleakly comic tour de force that’s by turns poignant, uproariously funny, and viscerally unsettling, this debut novel has shades of Bernhard, Beckett, and Bowles — and it announces the singular voice of Patty Yumi Cottrell.”  (Synopsis from Amazon)

 

15.  The Yellow Envelope by Kim Dinan  Out April 1

After Kim and her husband decide to quit their jobs to travel around the world, they’re given a yellow envelope containing a check and instructions to give the money away. The only three rules for the envelope: Don’t overthink it; share your experiences; don’t feel pressured to give it all away.

Through Ecuador, Peru, Nepal, and beyond, Kim and Brian face obstacles, including major challenges to their relationship. As she distributes the gift to people she encounters along the way she learns that money does not have a thing to do with the capacity to give, but that giving―of ourselves―is transformational.

 

 

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